Coursework

Coursework 2016-10-21T22:50:35+00:00

Students take three course modules that provide 9 credits of upper-division or graduate-level coursework in ecology, paleoanthropology, and archaeology. All coursework is taught in English by leaders in each field.

The course modules offered are:

Environments, Ecosystems and Evolution (ANP 310/ANT 510)

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An introduction to the ways scientists use the fossil and archaeological records to learn about past changes in Earth’s climates and environments, and how humanity’s ancestors responded to those changes physiologically and technologically. Interdisciplinary lectures will show evidence from the Turkana Basin’s paleoenvironmental, fossil and archaeological records of the dynamic interactions between the climate, environment, local food webs, and ancient human populations. This background will prepare students for training in paleoanthropological and archaeological field methods.

Paleoanthropological Field Methods (ANP 308/ANT 508)

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This course is an opportunity to participate in all aspects of a paleoanthropological research project, focusing on practical aspects of vertebrate paleontology, geology, zooarchaeology and taphonomy.  Students are trained in field reconnaissance, fossil survey, plotting, preservation, and collection, analysis and interpretation.  Hands-on examination of fossils from Plio-Pleistocene or Holocene sites around Lake Turkana will teach students how human ancestors and other animals adapted to the environments around them.  Experts from TBI, Stony Brook, and other institutions provide instruction in lectures, labs, and via fieldwork within the context of on-going projects.

Archaeological Field Methods (ANT 321/527)

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This course focuses on archaeological survey, excavation, artifact recovery and analysis.  Students are trained in excavation, recording, artifact retrieval, surveying, field sorting techniques, and interpretation.  Hands-on examination of prehistoric artifacts from Plio-Pleistocene or Holocene sites around Lake Turkana will teach students how human ancestors adapt culturally and technologically to the environments around them.  Experts from TBI, Stony Brook, and other institutions provide instruction in lectures, labs, and within the context of on-going field projects.

Students may also enroll in Independent Study (ANP/ANT 487 or ANT 610) for additional credits to perform research projects.